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JAGUAR LAND ROVER FINDS THE TEENAGERS WRITING
THE CODE FOR A SELF-DRIVING FUTURE

  • Fully-autonomous vehicles will require an estimated one billion lines of code – compared to just 145,000 needed to land on the moon in 1969
  • Tomorrow’s engineers are already learning to code at school to prepare
    for self-driving future and bridge the skills gap
  • Land Rover 4x4 In Schools programme is inspiring future talent to offset global STEM skills shortage
  • Almost five million more people with specialist digital skills needed globally by 2023
Whitley, UK. 16 April 2019: Tomorrow’s engineers are learning to code self-driving vehicles of the future today thanks to the unique Land Rover 4x4 in Schools programme.

Self-driving cars will require an estimated one billion lines of computer code1 – almost 1,000 times more than the 145,000 lines required by NASA to land Apollo 11 on the moon2. To meet the growing need for more coders to deliver these future autonomous
and connected vehicles, Jaguar Land Rover is looking to inspire the next generation of software engineers.

The talented teenagers competing in this year’s Land Rover 4x4 In Schools Technology Challenge world finals - a global education enrichment initiative aimed at encouraging young people to take up STEM careers - were able to write 200 lines of code in just
30 minutes, to successfully navigate a scale model Range Rover Evoque around a
5.7-metre circuit.

David Lakin, Head of Education from the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), said: “We’re in the midst of a digital skills shortage – the UK alone requires more than
1 million software engineers to fill the growing demand for roles requiring a knowledge
of coding, software engineering or electronics.

"Digital skills are vital to the economy, which is why the IET is proud to support initiatives like the Land Rover 4x4 In Schools Technology Challenge to ensure we inspire, inform and develop future engineers and encourage diversity across STEM subjects from a young age. If we are to safeguard jobs for the next generation, we must equip the workforce of the future with the skills they will need to engineer a better world.”

As of 2018, there were 23 million software developers worldwide but this population
is expected to grow to 27.7 million by 2023†, with World Economic Forum research suggesting 65% of students today will end up working in jobs that don’t currently exist*.

This year, Jaguar Land Rover will launch a new Digital Skills Apprenticeship programme
to attract the brightest computer engineers to help code its next-generation electric, connected and autonomous vehicles and support the factories of the future.

Nick Rogers, Executive Director of Product Engineering at Jaguar Land Rover, said: “Computer engineering and software skills are more important than ever in the rapidly changing automotive industry, and that will only increase as we see more autonomous, connected and electric vehicles on the roads. The UK will need 1.2 million more people with specialist digital skills by 2022, and as a technology company, it’s our job to help inspire and develop the next generation of technically curious and pioneering digital engineers. The Land Rover 4x4 In Schools Technology Challenge is just one of the ways
we are doing this, as well as our new Digital Skills Apprenticeship programme we are launching this year.”


The Land Rover 4x4 in Schools programme has helped the company reach more than four million young people since 2000. This year 110 students from 14 countries qualified for the world finals held at the University of Warwick, with NewGen Motors team from Greece lifting the trophy following two intensive days of competition.

Mark Wemyss-Holden, former teacher and Curriculum Content Developer, said:
“Coding is high on the agenda across industry and teachers do a fantastic job delivering the curriculum, but schools have competing priorities and are hamstrung by limited budgets and time. The private sector, and programmes like Land Rover 4x4 In Schools, have a real opportunity to bridge the gap between what learners enjoy studying and how that translates into a future career.”

Jaguar Land Rover is a leader in the development of Autonomous, Connected, Electric and Shared (ACES) mobility services and has invested in Global Pioneering Hubs around the world to capitalise on– including Shannon, Republic of Ireland; Budapest, Hungary and Portland, in the United States.

John Cormican, General Manager for Vehicle Engineering, Shannon, said: “Shannon has
an important role to play in realising the company’s vision for autonomous and connected vehicles, but we cannot deliver this future without the very best minds - individuals who could write the next chapter for Jaguar Land Rover. It's fantastic to see the company taking such an innovative approach towards investing in the next generation.”